What Better Time to Fall Back Into Helping Others Than Fall?

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Imagine, YOU, a 4-H spin club volunteer. This phenomenal opportunity will benefit you, local youth, and the community. Volunteering with 4-H allows adults to build new friendships, make connections with local youth, and make positive changes in our county!

The 4-H program uses experiential learning – this allows volunteers to offer 4-H’ers hands-on guidance and real-world experiences, helping our youth to build confidence and become leaders. With that being said, we are in the process of starting spin clubs. We are recruiting talented adult volunteers who are willing to share their talents with local youth. Spin clubs are special interest clubs that match your skill set and talents with a small group of young people who want to learn from you. It would require a minimum of six hours a year sharing your passion and unique talent with 4-H youth. The hours are planned around the volunteer’s availability. The club would meet six or more times for at least one hour per session. Meetings could be held once a week for six weeks or once a month for six months, as long as the six-hour minimum is met. There would be a minimum of five youth per club.

Some areas of interest for spin clubs are: arts and crafts, sewing, cooking, knitting, baking, cake decorating, science, photography, yoga, drawing, painting, grilling, electric, health, and archery. If you are talented or skilled and would be willing to share your knowledge with local youth, please consider starting a spin club.

As a 4-H volunteer, you will work with the 4-H staff and volunteers, partnering with local youth to mentor and empower them with skills that will last a lifetime. Volunteers serve in many capacities. Some volunteers might lead a club, teach workshops, judge events, chaperone, or help decorate for events. There are many volunteer opportunities available, depending on your time and commitment.

A brief history of 4-H:  4-H clubs were preceded by corn clubs for boys and canning clubs for girls, organized in the early 1900s by public school educators who wanted to broaden the knowledge and experience of their students. Along with agriculture and home economics, 4-H became an official part of the N.C. Cooperative Extension Service at about the same time N.C. Cooperative Extension was officially established by the U.S. Congress in 1914. The term “4-H Club” first appeared in a federal document in 1918, and by the mid-1920s, 4-H was well on its way to becoming a significant national program for youth. The 4-H Program is an American idea that has spread around the world. Throughout its long history, 4-H has constantly adapted to the ever-changing needs and interests of youth.

Spin clubs are new, and Robeson County 4-H is adjusting to what works for our youth and volunteers. Studies show that volunteering helps promote happiness and sense of well-being. Volunteers are the backbone of the Robeson County 4-H Program. They help our youth gain knowledge and life skills they need to be successful, productive, and responsible citizens. The Robeson County 4-H staff invites you to become a 4-H volunteer and share your talent and knowledge.

For more information, contact Wendy Maynor, Extension 4-H Youth Development Program Associate, at 910-671-3276, by E-mail at Wendy_Maynor@ncsu.edu, or visit our website.

NC State University and N.C. A&T State University are collectively committed to positive action to secure equal opportunity and prohibit discrimination and harassment regardless of age, color, disability, family and marital status, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, political beliefs, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy), sexual orientation, and veteran status. NC State, N.C. A&T, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and local governments cooperating.