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O. P. Owens Agriculture Center

Robeson County
Center

Robeson County Center gives our county's residents easy access to the resources and expertise of NC State University and NC A&T State University. Through educational programs, publications, and events, Cooperative Extension agents deliver unbiased, research-based information to Robeson County citizens. We can answer your questions on a wide array of topics. To find out how we can help you, browse our site or contact us by E-mail or phone.  Our office is open Monday through Friday, 8:15 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.  You can also find us on Facebook.

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O. P. Owens Agriculture Center

Robeson County
Center

Robeson County Center gives our county's residents easy access to the resources and expertise of NC State University and NC A&T State University. Through educational programs, publications, and events, Cooperative Extension agents deliver unbiased, research-based information to Robeson County citizens. We can answer your questions on a wide array of topics. To find out how we can help you, browse our site or contact us by E-mail or phone.  Our office is open Monday through Friday, 8:15 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.  You can also find us on Facebook.

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snow

Disaster Preparedness

Are you prepared for a disaster?  Visit Cooperative Extension's site to learn what you need to do to be better prepared: Disaster Preparedness Information

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mosquito

Warm Weather is Here
and So Are the Insects

Mosquitoes With July coming upon us soon and while most people are thinking about barbecuing and fireworks, rainfall over recent weeks is a good reminder to think about mosquitoes and protecting not only ourselves but also pets.  In 2013, we had 13 veterinary cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) in a cluster of six southeastern counties.  Eight of those cases occurred from July through early August.  Brunswick County recorded the first case (confirmed in mid-July), Cumberland County led the way with six cases, and Pender County had three.   In 2012, Cumberland and Brunswick County recorded the only cases, but they were recorded closer to September.  What this tells us is that we can't predict where and when the disease might occur. Horse owners may want to check their inoculation records to make sure that their horses' inoculations are still effective (which they should be if the horses were inoculated in the spring).  But remember that a booster inoculation is important about six months later. Despite the name, the disease affects not just horses but people as well.   Unlike some other disease-causing viruses of medical importance, you can't get EEE from contact with an infected person or horse.   Mosquitoes become infected when they bite an infected bird, and those mosquito species then feed on other birds which increases the reservoir of virus in the bird population during the course of the summer.  Other mosquito species acquire the virus when they bite infected birds and then act as "bridges" by passing the virus to horses or people on whom they subsequently feed and which then become infected. Children and the elderly are the biggest concern, so everyone should take appropriate protective measures and use insect repellents (see http://insects.ncsu.edu/Urban/repellents.htm).     We still recommend the usual measures of emptying rain-filled containers and other objects as well as unclogging gutters, drainage ditches, etc.  However, mosquitoes that can transmit EEE will also breed in flood waters and salt marshes, and for that reason, personal protection is critical. Many of these mosquitoes are active at dawn and dusk, so altering our activity times can help (but are not a guarantee against mosquito bites).  Again, we also urge horse owners to consult with the veterinarian about vaccinating their animals against these mosquito-borne diseases. People with dogs that spend a great deal of time outdoors need to make sure they are keeping up their pet's monthly medications, since some of the same mosquito species that are increasing in numbers can also transmit dog heartworm. Mosquito Control information is located at: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/ent/notes/Urban/mosquito.htm Paper Wasps Overwintering paper wasps (Polistes) queens are starting to become active.  Many of them have been passing the winter in wall voids, attics, and crawlspaces.  As a result, some of the wasps may stray indoors accidentally, but don't assume there is a nest in the wall, attic, or crawlspace.  They are usually slow moving (you would be too if you had slept all winter!)  and they're not aggressive, because these are not workers defending a nest.  So they are an easy target for a rolled-up newspaper, which is far safer than unloading a can of insecticide spray on them... and yourself and everything else in your house.  Foggers ("total release aerosols") are not affective and potentially hazardous. Those wasps that make it to the great outdoors will often be seen hovering near chimneys and other vertical objects.  The wasps are busy scoping out perspective nesting sites.  In most cases, they are too high up to make any sensible (i.e., "safe and effective") attempt at chemical control.  However, they would an easy target should you decide it's time to pressure-wash the siding on your house. With the early nests, there will only be few workers.  So the likelihood of getting stung is minimal. People who are very concerned about getting stung can spray any nest with one of those aerosol wasp and hornet sprays that propels the chemical about 15-20 feet.   But reminder - these wasps are actually beneficial and eat caterpillars and other insects that would likely be chomping down on the flower or vegetable garden later in the year.  For more information, click on the link below: http://insects.ncsu.edu/Urban/paperwasp.htm Carpenter Bees  It's finally (really) spring and a male carpenter bee's thoughts are turning to finding the girl bee of his dreams.  So right now you'll see the males buzzing about.  Carpenter bees do look like bumble bees but lack the yellow hairs on their abdomens.  You can actually identify the males, because they're often hovering in areas and you can see a white-colored spot on the middle of the face.  The males can buzz people sitting on benches, porches, etc., but they're harmless (male bees do not have stingers).  The males do not make galleries (drilling holes for the developing eggs) either.  When the lady bees make their appearance, they'll mate with the males, and then the females will excavate new galleries or possibly use an existing one (which is another reason to seal up the old ones). There are no magic bullets that are truly effective to stop the bees from drilling holes. We have information online at:  http://insects.ncsu.edu/Urban/carpenterbees.htm Information provided by: Michael Waldvogel, PhD Extension Associate Professor and Specialist, Structural and Industrial Pests North Carolina State University Department of Entomology

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Southern corn rust on upper surface of the leaf.

Southern Corn Rust
(SCR) Update for July 17, 2014

Southern Corn Rust (SCR) has been found in Greene, Lenoir, Jones, Wilson, Wayne, and Johnston Counties to date.  The current weather forecast with nighttime temperatures in the 60’s and moderate daytime conditions with the likelihood of thunder storms for most of the state provide good conditions for SCR to develop. Growers with susceptible hybrids (most hybrids are probably susceptible) need to make a fungicide application as soon as possible. Consult the Agricultural chemicals manual for fungicide recommendations on corn.  A combination fungicide would probably be best unless the field has been  sprayed recently with a strobillurin fungicide; then a straight triazole may be best so they can use a combination in two weeks. If July and August temperatures get back into the high 90’s and we have less rainfall, the need for fungicides decreases.   Late planted corn, however, may be especially vulnerable depending on how full season the corn is. DO I HAVE SOUTHERN CORN RUST OR COMMON RUST? Distinguishing SCR from common rust is not terribly difficult.  Common rust can be found on both upper and lower leaf surfaces, whereas SCR will primarily be on the upper side of the leaf or ear husks, and be fairly sparse on the underside of leaves. You can find the current distribution of Southern Corn Rust on the IPIPE web site at http://scr.ipmpipe.org/cgi-bin/sbr/public.cgi?host=Corn&pest=southern_corn_rust&language_sel=1. Consult the NC Agricultural Chemicals Manual at http://content.ces.ncsu.edu/21245.pdf for fungicdes labeled for corn.

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4-H

4-H Summer Fun
Activities

Register Today for a Summer of Fun! The Robeson County 4-H Program is happy to announce our summer programs and activities for 2014. We invite you to join us for a fun and exciting summer of learning. The summer program has activities for all youth between the ages of 5 and 19. Membership in 4-H is not required; however, 4-H members will receive the first opportunity to sign up for programs through April 30. After April 30, the program will open to the public for general enrollment. The brochure describes the summer programs available through Robeson County 4-H. You will find descriptions about the programs, the dates, and the costs. There is a minimum number of children who must sign up for some programs as well as a maximum number on most programs. We are able to provide these programs at a reasonable cost thanks to funding support from United Way of Robeson County. Enrollment To register, come by our office to complete the registration form, sign up for the programs you wish to participate in, and pay the fee. Registration will be handled on a first-come, first-served basis and will only be accepted upon receipt of fees. Telephone, electronic, faxed, and mailed registration will not be accepted. Registration will continue until the classes are filled. Please contact the 4-H office at 671-3276 with any questions. Individuals with disabilities and/or special needs interested in these programs should call so proper arrangements can be made. Click here to review the 2014 4-H Summer Fun Brochure.

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NEWS View All
CaseyHancock

Are You Interested in Sustainable Agriculture?

As defined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), sustainable agriculture is an integrated system of plant and animal production that, over the long term, will produce enough food and fiber for MORE »

Janice3

4-H Junior Chef Academy

I recently had the pleasure of working an entire week with 15 fabulous youth during our 2nd annual 4-H Junior Chef Academy. It was awesome seeing those young people learning not only how MORE »

Renee

Water Does the Body Good

Last November, I wrote an article about the importance of making smart drink choices and decreasing sugar consumption. Participants of the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), sponsored by North Carolina Cooperative MORE »

Janice3

Eating Healthy Can Save Money

By: Janice Fields Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Agent North Carolina Cooperative Extension, Robeson County Center Some people say healthy food costs more, but that is not necessarily true. Often, the cost is MORE »

TamikaMcLean

Barbecue Food Safety Tips

By: Tamika McLean 4-H Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Assistant North Carolina Cooperative Extension, Robeson County Center In just a few weeks, it will be the Fourth of July and many of MORE »

CampFun

Putting Your Money Where Your Mouth Is

Armchair quarterback is a favorite pastime while reading the paper or watching the news for many of us. How often have you read a headline or a story and come up with a MORE »

CaseyHancock

Strawberry Season: Support Our Local Growers!

By: Casey Hancock Extension Community Resource Development Agent – Local Foods and Tourism North Carolina Cooperative Extension, Robeson County Center The warmer weather brings the opening of farm stands and the availability of MORE »

More News
EVENTS View All
Cotton and Soybean Scouting SchoolTue Jul 29, 2014
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Where:
455 Caton Rd, Lumberton, NC 28360, USA
— 15 hours away
St. Paul's 4-H Pony Club MeetingSat Aug 2, 2014
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM Where:
St. Pauls
— 5 days away
4-H Creativity Day CampMon Aug 4, 2014 @ 8:30 AM -
Fri Aug 8, 2014 @ 5:00 PM— 7 days away
All Around All Stars 4-H Arts and Crafts Club MeetingThu Aug 7, 2014
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM Where:
Office
— 1 week away
Demonstration Plot TourFri Aug 8, 2014
8:00 AM - 9:00 AM Where:
5352 B T Rd, Lumberton, NC 28358, USA
— 2 weeks away
St. Paul's 4-H Pony Club MeetingSat Aug 9, 2014
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM Where:
St. Pauls
— 2 weeks away
Doin' It Big Entreprenurial 4-H Club MeetingSat Aug 9, 2014
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM Where:
Office
— 2 weeks away
Robeson County Master Gardeners AssociationMon Aug 11, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Where:
455 Caton Road, Lumberton, NC 28360
— 2 weeks away
More Events